One week, five schools, a lot of laughs

This spring break my son and I traveled to Washington, DC and visited three schools.


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Visiting schools over break?

Don’t be locked out because you call late.  Tours and informational sessions fill up early during high school breaks. Call now to reserve your space–you can always cancel if your plans change.   Photo credit: Locked Out or In by jkirkhart35, on...
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Senior Year 101: Reduce the Stress of the College Application Process in a Few Easy Steps!

Solid advice on how to get yourself (or your student) situated for a great start to the new school year and beyond…


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Invest in your future this summer.

Summer is just around the corner. For many of you that means sand, surf and snoozing.  While we are all for enjoying time off and relaxing in the sun—summer also provides high school students with great opportunities for a few “mind changing” experiences. For those of you old enough to work, finding a great summer job is invaluable.  It not only gives you insight into the world of work, but also helps develop essential skills for success outside of the classroom.  Paid or unpaid work will provide you with a more clear understanding of  the value of responsibility, reliability and a strong work ethic.  Never discount any job–even if the only thing you learn from working at a fast food joint or as a day camp counselor is that you never want to do these jobs again.  That is valuable information.  Store these tidbits away for when you consider possible career fields.  If you didn’t like working with children or at Mickey D’s when you were a teenager, what has changed that may interest you in these career fields now?  A job can give you a glimpse into a particular career, nudge you in a direction or help you steer clear of certain vocations.  Another thing to remember is that college admission officers take your work experiences into consideration regardless of whether it is flipping burgers or filing law reports. Other ways to make the most of your summer vacation is to “test drive” careers you find interesting by working or volunteering in that particular career. A first stop should be your high school guidance office to learn more about available internship opportunities. Remember, college for many is a short four year “gig” but you will be working for decades. So discovering a career that is both interesting and challenging to you will help create a more satisfying, rewarding and happier life. Combining work with academic pursuits may help you discover new and interesting parts of yourself.  Many colleges and universities have programs for high school students in a variety of academic areas such as engineering, writing, science or the fine arts. It is a great way for a student to discover if a school is a good fit by attending a summer program and living on campus.  Living in a dorm inBoston,New YorkCity orWashington,DCcan help you decide whether spending four years at an urban university is the right...
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We have busted the myths, now some facts

Admissions facts that stand the test of time. 1.      There are no guarantees. Even if you have a perfect score on the SAT or the ACT along with a 4.0 GPA–you are not guaranteed a place at your first choice institution.  Look at this example: 83% of high school valedictorians that applied to Princeton University in 2010 were rejected (see Princeton’s data here).  That is a hard fact! 2.      Critical and changing unknowns. Schools have their own agenda.  Their goal is to populate a community.  Remember, this is not just a numbers game.  Admissions is a balance of selecting students who fit the academic profile of the school and will bring to campus a rich variety of academic and co-curricular interests.  Applicants cannot possibly know what a school is looking for over time.  For example, a school might have just decided to increase biology majors or received a grant to increase the number of cellists.  As you can see the list can go on and change all the time. 3.      Competitive process. Remember all those valedictorians applying to Princeton?  Talk about competition.  Additionally, more students are applying to more schools (colleges) which increases the competition at all schools.  Many of our clients’ parents are surprised to learn how competitive the New York State system (SUNY) of colleges and universities have become.  It is not your parents SUNY any more! 4.      Costly investment–you know this.  The cost of higher education increases every year.  This is a big investment in your future.  You will spend a lot of time and money on your undergraduate education.  It makes sense to spend some time exploring your options and making good choices. Because there are many critical facts about the college selection process that applicants cannot control, we advise focusing on the things you can control.  It makes sense to spend time exploring your academic, professional, and co-curricular interests during your sophomore and junior year of high school.  Find out what you want out of your undergraduate education.  This effort will help you to focus and engage in the college selection process. 5. The pay off is priceless–if you spend time, effort, and possibly some money now during the exploration phase–you will reap the benefits of this investment when you are completing your applications. This will allow you to focus on the schools to which you will ultimately apply.  And once your hear back from schools you will be in a better position to compare your options and make the best decision for you. Let the exploration...
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Admissions 1 travels to Williams College

Admissions 1 travels to Williams College to collaborate with the Center for Talented Youth (a program of Johns Hopkins University) in the Pathways to College Program. Admissions 1 Educational Consultants are presenting a workshop on college essay writing at the Center for Talented Youth program: Pathways to College.  admissions1 consultants will present an interactive, hands-on workshop for 9-12...
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