Weighing your options with an objective advocate from Admissions 1

Admissions letters have arrived. Are you and your family weighing your options? Not sure which direction to go? Talk to the Admissions1 Professionals–your objective advocate in the college admissions process.


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You Need an Affordability Strategy for College

High School Juniors are poised to begin the college selection process.  This is a long (and sometimes drawn out) process.  We recommend that families break it down into three distinct phases:  1) Exploration –this is the time to consider where you would like to attend school, what you will study, and what your goals are.  Do you prefer the city over a rural setting?  Would you like a traditional liberal arts curriculum or would you prefer a professional program and do you understand the difference?   Would a large (over 10,000 students) school be your first choice or would you enjoy a small (less than 5,000 students) school? This is the time to ask these kinds of questions and find schools that fit your goals.  2) Application Completion –completing the many forms, writing your college essay, sending in transcripts, recommendations, activities resume, and interviewing–all in a timely fashion.  3) Decision Making–comparing all of your positive outcomes.  Taking a look at your academic, professional, co-curricular, and affordability goals and choosing the school that most closely meets your criteria. Students and families should be prepared to do the lion’s share of the work in the exploration phase.  By encouraging students to frontload their efforts in this process, they will become empowered and engaged in their educational future.  This leadership role combined with good decision making skills will transfer favorably once on a college campus.  This will give new college students the confidence to engage positively in their new environment. The exploration period is the time to focus not only on academic and professional goals, but also on how your family will finance this costly investment.  The exploration period should include an honest discussion among family stakeholders about paying for college.  One strategy is to research and apply to a range of schools that offer a variety of financial opportunities.  For example, we suggest students apply to at least one state school (we are based in NY which has 64 state campuses and are a fabulous educational bargain) and a number of schools that offer academic merit scholarships (scholarships based on academic merit NOT financial situation).  Remember, you won’t get an academic scholarship if you don’t apply to schools offering academic scholarships. Good luck and have fun exploring your...
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The College of St. Rose–Albany’s Secret Revealed

The College of St. Rose in Albany, New York, is one of the best kept secrets in the Capital District.  The school is a haven of activity and has a small (but) bustling campus green.  This is not a community of commuters dropping in to take a class, but rather a home to 5000 students engaged and excited about their academic and co-curricular pursuits. The facilities are a combination of state of the art buildings, such as the recently opened Massry Center for the Arts, home to a 400-seat auditorium featuring ‘state of the art’ acoustics, and older renovated turn of the century Victorians. The school has made a commitment to improving and upgrading all its buildings with many different phases of construction seen around campus.  Directly behind the Massry Center is the soon-to-be completed communications center, scheduled to open February 2010. St. Rose has a stellar reputation for producing dynamic educators.  The programs are abundant and the new Lally School of Education building is one of the top in the field.  But there is more to St. Rose than the Lally School. Sixty-three available majors include those in Music Industry, Sports Management, or one of the six combined bachelor’s/master’s degrees that can be completed in five years or less.  The size of the school is manageable—always new people to meet, but often a familiar face on campus.  The city location and close proximity to other colleges and universities make St. Rose a happening place to be a college student. At less than $33,000 a year with 95% of all students receiving financial aid, and the average financial aid award at approximately $18,000, St. Rose is also one of the best buys around. The College is committed to enrolling high achieving students and has “put its money where its mouth is” as evidenced by the number of academic merit scholarships given each year to qualified students. These awards are based purely on academic merit and are available to both first-year and transfer students. St. Rose is also a top competitor in DII athletics.  The Golden Knights boast a women’s soccer team which (at this writing) is #2 in the country. Once again St. Rose has shown its commitment to students by continuing to make it a great place to study and live.  The college’s new athletic fields will help to continue the Golden Knights’ success.  The new fields will...
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